A century after the first President of Israel made his vital discovery about acetone at The University of Manchester, we are celebrating his legacy through a collaboration with the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel.

In 1915, Chaim Weizmann discovered a more sustainable way of making acetone which was required for the manufacture of cordite. His work attracted the attention of the British Government and six distilleries were requisitioned for the mass production of this explosive powder. As shell production rose from 500,000 in the first five months of the First World War to 16.4 million in 1915, Weizmann was credited with a significant impact on the war effort.

Today, the Faculty has eight links with the Weizmann Institute all of which are undertaking significant research. Now, thanks to the Alliance Family Foundation, funding is in place for seven further partnerships.

The Weizmann Institute hosted a two day symposium on March 24 to celebrate the scientific discoveries already made through Professor Steffen Jung (Weizmann Institute of Science), Lord Alliance and Professor Werner Muller (University of Manchester)the Lord Alliance Get Connected Grants. Faculty scientist Professor Werner Muller’s partnership with Stefan Jung was awarded the Lord Alliance Prize of £100,000. Their work has shed light on how the cells in our gut respond to foreign parasites such as worms and how they may trigger diseases. Other discoveries made possible through the grants have impacted neural conditions, food security, wound healing, and cancer. Professor Martin Humphries, Dean of the Faculty, says:

“In establishing the concept of the Get Connected scheme, Benny Geiger and I aimed to build on this historical link and provide a means for the excellent scientists in both institutions to forge new interactions. The Get Connected programme is a shining example of what can be achieved when such researchers are given the freedom and resources to join forces with other like-minded teams. Put simply, what is achieved is progress at an accelerated rate.”

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